Interpretation Training Programs




 Celebrates 17 Years of
Interpretation Training

Click here for a program fact sheet
To view the 2019 Interpreter List, please click here!

SNHAHEC has offered the Interpretation Training Program since 2002 to increase the number of health care, community, and legal interpreters in NH. We also screen bilingual individuals/employees for language proficiency. In addition SNHAHEC offers cultural competency training to healthcare providers, social services workers, educational and law enforcement agencies, community based organizations, and other interested parties.


 Classes for 2019 and 2020:

64-hour Health Care Community Interpretation Training
A 64 hour training is offered to bilingual individuals wishing to become foreign language legal interpreters. This curriculum is comprised of basic standards of interpreting as well as legal terminology and elements of the legal system.

Location: Amoskeag Health (MCHC), 145 Hollis Street, Manchester, NH 
Dates: September 17-December 10, 2019
Tuesdays/Thursdays: 5:15pm to 9:00 pm

For more information please View the brochure here.



70-hour Legal Interpretation Training

A 70-hour training is offered to individuals wishing to become legal interpreters. The curriculum is comprised of language access law, the role of the judicial interpreter, the protocol of interpretation in court and in other legal settings, the code of ethics, memory development, overview of the judicial system and more.

Call for information. Click here for the registration form.

Location: TBD

Dates-February-April 2020

 

Interpretation Training Classes for 2019

​​

70-hour Legal Interpretation Training

70-hour training is offered to individuals wishing to become legal interpreters. The curriculum is comprised of language access law, the role of the judicial interpreter, the protocol of interpretation in court and in other legal settings, the code of ethics, memory development, overview of the judicial system and more.

Click here for a generic registration form

 

 

Testimonial From:  Maurita Chukwuezi – Cape-Verdean/Spanish/Portuguese Interpreter (first row, first from the left)

“What I found interesting about the Legal Interpreting Training (LIT), was how little I knew about classifications of crime and the whole legal process.

Having interpreted in various legal settings prior to the class, just didn't cut out a clear picture of the law enforcement, judiciary system and how laws and regulations came about to function the way that they do today. I also learned how the role of the interpreter changes in different environments like an attorney’s office versus court versus police department.  It was worth for me commuting from Rhode Island to Manchester twice a week for this training. It opened my eyes. It inspired me to want to go to the Law School!

Thank you Instructor, Florentina Dinu.”

 

64-hour Health Care Community Interpretation Training

 64 hour training is offered to bilingual individuals wishing to become foreign language health care and community (social services, education, etc.) interpreters. The curriculum includes:  language access law, the role of the interpreter, the protocol of interpretation, the national code of ethics & standards of practice, memory development, basic anatomy and medical terminology, vocabulary development in both languages, impact of culture on interpretation, resources for interpreters, assisted role-plays, groundwork preparation for the national certification, and more.

Click here for a generic registration form

Testimonial from Hayat Wali – Arabic Interpreter (pictured in blue hijab with her family and Governor Maggie Hassan at the Citizenship Ceremony)

"I want to thank you for changing my life.  Before taking the interpretation training both my husband and I were in the deep dark place; my husband was unemployed and I worked as cashier at Walmart. I was a teacher for 15 years, in my country, and I was sad that I could not teach in the US too. We had many problems. Taking the training gave us skills to build our careers in interpretation, I found my life, and I felt you give me the key to the new life in US. I worked as an interpreter, and then Concord Community Adult Education offered me the opportunity to teach Arabic again. I also took Community Health Worker training with SNHAHEC. All of these greatly improved my chances for employment.  I’ve got employed with Manchester Community Health Center, I teach, and I interpret in many places, recently for the Language Bank. My family is very happy now and recently we’ve got our US citizenship.” 


Foreign Language Medical and Legal Interpretation

Why should my organization be concerned about foreign language interpretation?
What is medical interpretation?
I am interested in receiving training to be a foreign language medical interpreter.
I am interested in assessing the language p
roficiency of my organization's bilingual staff.

I am interested in arranging for a medical interpreter to come to my facility.

What is legal interpretation?
I am interested in receiving training to be a foreign language legal interpreter.
I am interested in arranging for a legal interpreter to come to my facility.
I am interested in obtaining training on cultural competency for myself or my organization.


 



15-hour Interpretation Training on
Infectious Diseases

 

Join us in evaluating this pilot program. For  EXPERIENCED, TRAINED INTERPRETERS who are interested in building skills to work with patients / clients with infectious diseases. The 15-hour curriculum includes

- a review of protocol for interpretation

- an overview of public health

- information about Infectious diseases
 

Call for information.


Why should my organization be concerned about foreign language interpretation?
 

According to the Census Bureau's survey of the population in 2016, New Hampshire's estimated population was 1,316,470. The Census also reports that New Hampshire has more than doubled the number of residents who are ethnic minorities. Figures show that New Hampshire's Hispanic or Latino population has more than doubled since 1990 with a total of 36,704 individuals and its Asian population increased by 75%, totaling 28,407. In Nashua alone, the Hispanic population grew 125%. Also black or African American population increased to over 15,000.  NH has also experienced a rise in the number of refugees making homes in our state. The School Department reports that over 44 languages are spoken in Nashua public schools and over 70 languages are spoken by the students in Manchester public schools with approximately 1700 children in the Manchester school system being enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) programs.
These languages range from the more common Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, French, Native American languages to Eastern European languages as Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Bosnian/Serbo-Croatian to Asian languages like Nepali, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Laotian, Hindi, Rohyngian-Burmese, to African languages like Somali and Somali Bantu, Arabic, Lingala, Swahili, and many more.

As more and more immigrants come to the US, healthcare and social services professionals who are open to other cultures can use the knowledge and sensitivity that they obtain in order to provide holistic care for clients coming from other countries, who speak foreign languages.

The Language Access Laws for LEP (limited English proficiency) individuals - language assistance to reduce discrimination in access to public services including healthcare and social services are:

 

  • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects people from discrimination based on race, color or national origin in programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance including Medicare, Medicaid, or grant funding to offer services.

 

 Title VI states that:  No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin*, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

*National origin includes individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP)

For more information please go to:  LEP.gov  

 

  • The National Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) Standards in Health and Health Care developed by the Office of Minority Health (OMH) are intended to advance health equity, improve quality and help eliminate health care disparities. The three themes of the fifteen CLAS standards are:
    • Governance, Leadership, and workforce.
    • Communication and Language Assistance
    • Engagement, Continuous Improvement, and Accountability.

 

For more information please go to:

https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlid=53

 

Language proficiency assessment for the staff at my organization. 

The purpose of assessing language proficiency is to assure that the bilingual staffs employed by your organization have the necessary skills in English and the target language(s) to effectively work with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) clients. All participants in the Interpretation training are required to pass a language proficiency assessment. Organizations working with individuals who are not yet able to attend the interpretation training may still arrange to be assessed for language proficiency. Please call 603-895-1524 x 5 to make arrangements for the screening.

What is medical interpretation?

Foreign Language Medical Interpretation refers to the oral communication between a patient and a health care worker, through a third party. The meaning of what is said in one language is "interpreted" or worded to reflect the same meaning in another language. Foreign language medical interpretation refers to this art in the spoken language form when communicating in English and a language other than English. Translation occurs when the message is communicated from one language to another in written form. Sign language interpretation is the form of communication utilized to "speak" with patients who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 "Thank you for changing my life.  Before taking the interpretation training both my husband and I were in the deep dark place; my husband was unemployed and I worked as cashier at Walmart. I was a teacher for 15 years, in my country, and I was sad that I could not teach in the US too. We had many problems. Taking the training gave us skills to build our carriers in interpretation, I found my life, and I felt you give me the key to the new life in US. I worked as an interpreter, then Concord Community Adult Education offered me the opportunity to teach Arabic again. Now I am employed with Manchester Community Health Center, I teach, and I interpret in many places.  My family is very happy now and recently we’ve got our US citizenship. Soon I’ll work for the NH Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs".

 Hayat Wali – Arabic Interpreter

I am interested in receiving training to become a Foreign Language Medical Interpreter.

For the first time in New Hampshire, beginning 2012 SNHAHEC is going to offer the nationally renowned program called The Health Care Community Interpreter, by Cross Cultural Communications of Columbia MD. This is a comprehensive 60-hour program that teaches interpreters to work in health care, educational, social services and some legal fields.  The curriculum includes language access laws, the role of the interpreter, the protocol of interpretation, the national code of ethics & standards of practice, memory development, health care in the USA, anatomy of the human body, medical procedures, medical terminology vocabulary development in both languages, impact of culture on interpretation, resources for interpreters and information about the national certification and more.


Medical Interpretation Spring 2009 Graduating Class


I am interested in assessing the language proficiency of my organization.

The purpose of assessing language proficiency is to assure that the interpreter has the necessary skills in English and the target language(s). All participants in the Interpretation training are required to pass a language proficiency assessment. Organizations working with individuals who are not able to attend the 54 hour training may still arrange to be assessed. Please see the attached Language Proficiency brochure for more information.


I am interested in arranging for a medical interpreter to come to my facility.

You can call a trained interpreter directly. You can also contact the Language Bank at Lutheran Social Services of New England at 224-8111 and they will secure an interpreter for you.

It is up to the health care organization to negotiate fees directly with either the Language Bank or a free lance interpreters.



What is legal interpretation?

Foreign Language Legal Interpretation refers to the oral communication between a limited English proficiency (LEP) individual and an official of the legal system (judge, attorney, prosecutor, etc) through a third party - the legal (or court) interpreter. What is said in one language is "interpreted" or worded to reflect the same meaning in another language. Translation occurs when the message is communicated from one language to another in written form.

 
I am interested in arranging for a legal interpreter to come to my facility.

You can call a trained interpreter directly. Click here to see the list of interpreters who have graduated from the Interpreters Training and their respective languages. You can also contact the Language Bank at Lutheran Social Services at 224-8111 and they will secure an interpreter for you. It is up to your organization to negotiate fees directly with either the Language Bank or a free lance interpreter.

 




Cultural Competency Training


The Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center & New Hampshire Minority Health Coalition collaborate to offer a variety of Cultural Competency training. Continuing Education for health professionals is available. To sign up for a session, please click here to link to the activities calendar. In the future you will be able to click on the programs listed below and go directly to the brochure, until then please call Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center at (603) 895-1514 for additional information.

*Working with Medical Interpreters

*Culture & Cultural Competency

*Simulated Patients

*Culture Forums

*New Hampshire Minority Health Coalition

*Assessing Language Interpretation Capacity Among New Hampshire Health Care Providers.

*Medical Interpretation Resource Guide



"I know what to do if I encounter a problem with a client or a provider. You have someone's life in between your hands." Faten Alhassun, Interpreter in Arabic.

 

Foreign (Spoken) Language Interpretation

The basic purpose of an interpreter is to facilitate understanding in communication between people who are speaking different languages.

  • Interpreters – transmit an oral message from one language to another
  • Translators  - transmit a written message from one language to another

Training and Certification

  • A trained Interpreter is a person who successfully completed professional training (The National Council on Interpreting in Health Care recommends a minimum of 40 hour training)
  • A certified Interpreter is a person who is certified by a national interpreter organization (or state/federal court for legal interpreters) following an examination of language competency and interpretation knowledge. 

Healthcare Community Class 2017

 

 

For individuals interested in becoming interpreters:

How is the Language Industry Performing?

From: United States Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics 2019:  

Quick Facts: Interpreters and Translators

2017 Median Pay

$47,190 per year
$22.69 per hour

Typical Entry-Level Education

Bachelor's degree/Minimum 40 h Interpretation Training

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

 

 

Number of Jobs, 2016

68,200

Job Outlook, 2016-2026

18% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2016-26

12,100

 

 

"What Interpreters and Translators Do and Work Environment

Interpreters and translators convert information from one language into another language. Interpreters work in spoken or sign language; translators work in written language.  Interpreters work in settings such as schools, hospitals, courtrooms, meeting rooms, and conference centers. Some work for translation and interpretation companies, individual organizations, or private clients. Many translators also work remotely. Self-employed interpreters and translators frequently have variable work schedules. Most interpreters and translators work full time during regular business hours.

Pay: The median annual wage for interpreters and translators was $47,190 in May 2017.

Job Outlook

Employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 18 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. Globalization and large increases in the number of non-English-speaking people in the United States will drive employment growth. Job prospects should be best for those who have professional certification.

Learn more about interpreters and translators by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations."

In NH training for interpreters is required, certification is not.

 

SNHAHEC Cross Cultural Training Opportunities

 

SNHAHEC offers a variety of Cultural Competency training. Continuing Education for health professionals and social workers is available. For more information please call Florentina at the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center at (603) 895-1514 x 5.  Some of the topics of training are:

  • Cross Cultural Skills in Health Care and/or Social Services and/or Behavioral Health
  • Clinical Case Studies Across Cultures
  • Culture Forums
  •  Working effectively with Interpreters and/or Simulated Patients from Diverse Cultures
  • Class: A Hidden Culture  
  • Introduction to Health Literacy
  • Online Modules: Training resources for cultural competency education are available online. A couple of topics include:
  • Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity – on Children’s BH workforce website
  • Cultural Sensitive Care

 

Developing a Culturally Effective Organization

Individuals can work to build skills in cultural competency and cross cultural communication. There also opportunities for organizations to become more culturally effective as well.  Click bellow to view the Culturally Effective Organizations Toolkit which uses the seven part framework to help organizations meet the needs of all people. http://mchc-nh.org/center-of-excellenve-care/